Small Scale Fisheries Management : Lessons from Cockle Harvesters in Nicaragua and Tanzania

The role of women in gleaning fisheries tends to be underestimated and poorly documentedm although they play an important role in coastal food security and income generation. This article describes two initiatives for co-management of women dominated cockle (Anadara spp.) fisheries implemented in Za...

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Main Authors: Crawford, Brian, Herrera, María Dolores, Hernández, Nelvia del Socorro, Rivas Leclair, Carlos, Jiddawi, Narriman, Masumbuko, Semba, Haws, María
Format: Artículo
Language: Español
Published: Taylor & Francis 2010
Subjects:
Online Access: http://repositorio.uca.edu.ni/31/
http://repositorio.uca.edu.ni/31/1/Coastal%20Management.pdf
id RepoUCA31
recordtype eprints
spelling RepoUCA312016-05-15T17:09:18Z http://repositorio.uca.edu.ni/31/ Small Scale Fisheries Management : Lessons from Cockle Harvesters in Nicaragua and Tanzania Crawford, Brian Herrera, María Dolores Hernández, Nelvia del Socorro Rivas Leclair, Carlos Jiddawi, Narriman Masumbuko, Semba Haws, María 639 Caza, pesca, conservación The role of women in gleaning fisheries tends to be underestimated and poorly documentedm although they play an important role in coastal food security and income generation. This article describes two initiatives for co-management of women dominated cockle (Anadara spp.) fisheries implemented in Zanzibar Island of Tanzania and in Nicaragua that were based on a Fiji model. In each case, significant progress was made at the pilot scale but required adaptation to the community and national context. The Nicaragua case resulted in increasing densities of cockles inside and outside small scale no-take zones in a small estuary after a two-year period of implementation. In Zanzibar, out of several no-take sites established on reef flats, only one showed similar results. Other sites’ poor performance is likely due to poor site selection, small size, and non-compliance. Varying degrees of poaching affected both locations and continues to be an issue. In Zanzibar, local and national government played highly supporting roles whereas in Nicaragua, local government was supportive but national government continues to exhibit top-down decision-making, while still evaluating the alternative co-management approach. In both cases, university extension initiatives were influential in building community capacity for management and playing an advocacy role with national government. Both locations are poised for scaling up to more geographic sites as well as fostering policy change that can lead to Taylor & Francis 2010-06-01 Article PeerReviewed text es cc_by_nc http://repositorio.uca.edu.ni/31/1/Coastal%20Management.pdf Crawford, Brian and Herrera, María Dolores and Hernández, Nelvia del Socorro and Rivas Leclair, Carlos and Jiddawi, Narriman and Masumbuko, Semba and Haws, María (2010) Small Scale Fisheries Management : Lessons from Cockle Harvesters in Nicaragua and Tanzania. Coastal Management, 38 (3). pp. 195-215. ISSN 0892-0753 print / 1521-0421 online
institution Universidad Centroamericana
collection Repositorio UCA
language Español
topic 639 Caza, pesca, conservación
spellingShingle 639 Caza, pesca, conservación
Crawford, Brian
Herrera, María Dolores
Hernández, Nelvia del Socorro
Rivas Leclair, Carlos
Jiddawi, Narriman
Masumbuko, Semba
Haws, María
Small Scale Fisheries Management : Lessons from Cockle Harvesters in Nicaragua and Tanzania
description The role of women in gleaning fisheries tends to be underestimated and poorly documentedm although they play an important role in coastal food security and income generation. This article describes two initiatives for co-management of women dominated cockle (Anadara spp.) fisheries implemented in Zanzibar Island of Tanzania and in Nicaragua that were based on a Fiji model. In each case, significant progress was made at the pilot scale but required adaptation to the community and national context. The Nicaragua case resulted in increasing densities of cockles inside and outside small scale no-take zones in a small estuary after a two-year period of implementation. In Zanzibar, out of several no-take sites established on reef flats, only one showed similar results. Other sites’ poor performance is likely due to poor site selection, small size, and non-compliance. Varying degrees of poaching affected both locations and continues to be an issue. In Zanzibar, local and national government played highly supporting roles whereas in Nicaragua, local government was supportive but national government continues to exhibit top-down decision-making, while still evaluating the alternative co-management approach. In both cases, university extension initiatives were influential in building community capacity for management and playing an advocacy role with national government. Both locations are poised for scaling up to more geographic sites as well as fostering policy change that can lead to
format Artículo
author Crawford, Brian
Herrera, María Dolores
Hernández, Nelvia del Socorro
Rivas Leclair, Carlos
Jiddawi, Narriman
Masumbuko, Semba
Haws, María
author_sort Crawford, Brian
title Small Scale Fisheries Management : Lessons from Cockle Harvesters in Nicaragua and Tanzania
title_short Small Scale Fisheries Management : Lessons from Cockle Harvesters in Nicaragua and Tanzania
title_full Small Scale Fisheries Management : Lessons from Cockle Harvesters in Nicaragua and Tanzania
title_fullStr Small Scale Fisheries Management : Lessons from Cockle Harvesters in Nicaragua and Tanzania
title_full_unstemmed Small Scale Fisheries Management : Lessons from Cockle Harvesters in Nicaragua and Tanzania
title_sort small scale fisheries management : lessons from cockle harvesters in nicaragua and tanzania
publisher Taylor & Francis
publishDate 2010
url http://repositorio.uca.edu.ni/31/
http://repositorio.uca.edu.ni/31/1/Coastal%20Management.pdf
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score 10.6825905