What is the ‘Fight Against Corruption’ in Nicaragua?

Two hundred years ago in Great Britain, the political system was dominated by electoral power exercised through rotten boroughs, a system characterized by institutionalized corruption - these electoral boroughs were owned by local elites, and voting was restricted to a handful of people. Whilst i...

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Autor Principal: Cloke, Jon
Formato: Artículo
Idioma: Español
Publicado: UCA Publicaciones 2011
Materias:
Acceso en línea: http://repositorio.uca.edu.ni/1088/
http://repositorio.uca.edu.ni/1088/
http://repositorio.uca.edu.ni/1088/1/encuentro89articulo5.pdf
Sumario: Two hundred years ago in Great Britain, the political system was dominated by electoral power exercised through rotten boroughs, a system characterized by institutionalized corruption - these electoral boroughs were owned by local elites, and voting was restricted to a handful of people. Whilst industrially she was the wonder of the world, the political system in Great Britain was restricted, corruption was the norm, and it seemed impossible to imagine that such an ancient system could be changed. By the time of the Reform Act of 1832 however, Britain had already been going through a process of constitutional change lasting for hundreds of years – it is only now, from our position of 20/20 hindsight, that we choose to interpret all of the events since the signing of the Magna Carta in 1215 as if it were some seamless whole, an inevitable process that would lead to the position of superior moral governance that we appear to think we are in now.